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Earlier this week I was helping a colleague write some vanilla JavaScript to prevent a form from being submitted multiple times by an overzealous button clicker. The solution needed to be some framework-free JavaScript code. Thankfully this is pretty simple to do, so I thought I’d share some of the options here.

Whilst working on a site I’ve been developing using a Laravel Homestead Vagrant box I discovered that the box’s clock had drifted out of sync with my laptop by about 10 minutes. Normally this wouldn’t be much of an issue for me, but in my case I was trying to authenticate via an API using OAuth and that time difference was causing the authentication to fail. The solution to my authentication issue was to reset Homestead’s clock to the correct time, but obviously over time this would likely go out of sync again.

The other night I downloaded a fresh install of Laravel 5.4 using Homestead as my development server and quickly hit upon issues running Mix, Laravel’s Webpack API.

If you need to order results from a MySQL query by a specific field value first then there’s a couple of approaches you can use. Let’s use as an example a table of countries where we want to order alphabetically but put the United Kingdom first.

PHP traits provide a convenient means of sharing methods between classes. There are times though that we may need to override or extend a method defined in a trait attached to a class. Let’s take a look at how we can achieve this.

I’ve just released a new beta version of arc_meta for Textpattern 4.6.

As with the previous beta release, this one has a minimum requirement of Textpattern 4.6 which is also still in beta release; so neither of them are recommended for use on a live production site. However, if you use arc_meta and are testing the new version of Textpattern please check out this new release.

I’m a keen advocate for following coding standards. They help maintain consistency in code, especially when developing with others, and can generally help you to write better code. I work with Sublime Text for developing in PHP and have it set up to check against whichever coding standard I am currently using as I code. For PHP development the tool to use is PHP CodeSniffer which I’ve previously written about setting up for Sublime Text 3 on this site.

TinyMCE’s pagebreak plugin is a handy way of providing users a way of marking breaks in content by placing a HTML comment in the source code denoting the break. However, if you are using the editor’s valid_elements attribute to restrict HTML elements used in the content (a good idea if you don’t want all sorts of messy markup getting added) you need to make sure you allow comment tags.